Developing a Progressive Narrative

As many may already know, science fiction and speculative fiction in general can investigate and articulate the state of our nation and/or world in very direct but also metaphorical ways. We have talked about Star Trek, for instance, on Equal Time and how Gene Roddenberry was able to discuss humanism and naturalism via the small and large screen. And there have been many novels and short stories since at least the late 19th Century which have done the same.

Victoria N Alexander and Adrienne Maree Brown are two authors who have relatively new speculative fiction books out. Victoria, who has a PhD in English and philosophy of science, is also a novelist and the founder of Dactyl, a foundation that fosters dialogue between artists and scientists. She is the author of several novels including the topic of today’s discussion, Locus Amoenus. The novel brings Shakespeare into the post-9/11 world we currently experience and sows an emotionally powerful geopolitical drama.

Adrienne Maree Brown is an author, a life/love work coach, a singer (including wedding singer), events facilitator and a scholar on the late Science Fiction novelist Octavia Butler. In Octavia’s Brood, Adrienne has co-edited a collection of both speculative and science fiction stories founded on the spirit and creativity of the late author.

New Economy Project, a Conversation at the Brooklyn Society for Ethical Culture w/ Matthew LaClair

What are the problems facing New York City’s under-served communities and how can we work to fix them? The New Economy Project‘s co-director Deyanira Del Río and communications coordinator Luis Caridad sit down with Matthew LaClair to discuss social and economic justice in New York City. The heart of the interview was conducted in front of an audience, thanks to the Brooklyn Society for Ethical Culture.

Goodbye God?

We will speak with comic-book author Sean Michael Wilson, whose graphic novel “Goodbye God?” takes readers on a tour of many of the issues surrounding religion and the consequences of belief.

Wilson explores the creationism/evolution controversy, ultimately showing that the arguments in favor of it are weak and that the evidence favors evolution – despite the controversy among the general public.

We’ll discuss these topics and more, as well as how Wilson shows in the graphic novel that belief ultimately doesn’t make as much sense as it may at first seem – leading us to say a final goodbye to god.

Sean Michael Wilson is a comic-book writer from Scotland, living in Japan. He has had many books published with a variety of US, UK and Japanese publishers, such as a graphic-novel version of  ‘A Christmas Carol (‘Best of 2008’, Sunday Times), ‘AX:alternative manga’ (‘Best ten books of 2010’, Publishers Weekly), ‘Parecomic’ (with an introduction by Noam Chomsky), and a manga version of the Japanese classic ‘The Book of Five Rings’. His books are often on themes of history, biography and social issues.